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Archive for October 2011

Science Policy Around the Web – October 26, 2011

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Our weekly linkpost, bringing you interesting and informative links on science policy issues buzzing about the internet.

Panel Endorses HPV Vaccine for Boys of 11 – Boys and young men should be vaccinated against human papillomavirus, or HPV, to protect against anal and throat cancers that can result from sexual activity, a federal advisory committee said Tuesday. The recommendation by the panel, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is likely to transform the use of the HPV vaccine, since most private insurers pay for vaccines once the committee recommends them for routine use. The HPV vaccine is unusually expensive. Its three doses cost pediatricians more than $300, and pediatricians often charge patients hundreds more. (via New York Times, by Gardiner Harris)

Cancer Care’s “Culture of Excess” – Most developed countries spend 4-7% of their total healthcare budgets on cancer.  A new report in The Lancet Oncology by oncologists and patient advocates has given a sobering list of insights into the factors for these billowing costs.  Top among them:  we’re getting older, there’s more technology available and we’re (over)using it, and the current health care pricing models don’t help.  (from PLoS Blogs by Jessica Wapner)

OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Senators weigh Keystone pipeline strategySenators battling the proposed Keystone XL oil sands pipeline are mulling their options as the Obama administration’s decision on the controversial project looms. Critics of the proposed $7 billion, 1,700-mile pipeline say the State Department’s favorable environmental analysis was flawed, and that the review lacked integrity because it was performed by a company with financial ties to pipeline developer TransCanada. (via E2 Wire – THE HILL’s Energy and Environment Blog, by Ben Geman and Andrew Restuccia )

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

October 26, 2011 at 9:28 pm

Posted in Linkposts

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Science Policy Around the Web – October 20, 2011

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By alvimann on Morguefile.com

By:  Rebecca Cerio

Our weekly linkpost, bringing you interesting and informative links on science policy issues buzzing about the internet.

Parents urged (again) to limit young childrens’ media consumption –  The American Academy of Pediatrics has released a report summarizing recent studies warning that video screen time provides no educational benefits for children under age 2 and takes away time from activities that do, such as playing and interacting with parents. (via the NYTimes.  The full report can be read for free here.)

Should this heroin overdose cure be in every first aid kit? – Naloxone can quickly reverse the effects of opioid drugs, including heroin, OxyContin and Vicodin.  It produces no high, is impossible to overdose on, and has been used by emergency personnel to save the lives of overdose victims for decades.  Yet, it is currently available by prescription only.  (via Maia Szalavitz  on the NYT Opinionator blog)

Weight loss programs may save Medicare $15B – “The proposal is modeled on a program developed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the YMCA of the USA, and the private insurance company UnitedHealth Group.  Under the program, conducted in partnership with the YMCA, a trained lifestyle coach helps overweight people at risk for diabetes learn about healthier food and create a fitness plan to increase physical activity. Studies of this program and others like it have found that participants age 60 and older lose weight and reduce the risk of developing diabetes by up to 71 percent. (via Futurity.org)

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

October 20, 2011 at 3:20 pm

Science Policy Around the Web – October 12, 2011

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By:  Rebecca Cerio
The first of our weekly linkposts, bringing you interesting and informative links on science policy issues from the internet and beyond!
  • Researchers reconstruct genome of the Black Death
    Published in Nature, along with a hefty round of ethics committee meetings, no doubt.  The authors found some interesting evolutionary tidbits:  “The genomic data show that this bacterial strain, or variant, is the ancestor of all modern plagues we have today worldwide. Every outbreak across the globe today stems from a descendant of the medieval plague,” [says Johannes Krause, one of the lead authors.]
  • Florida Governor Scott Says Florida Doesn’t Need More Anthropologists
    He also suggests that anthropology isn’t a science.  The American Anthropological Association begs to differ.
  • Standing desks in classrooms help kids burn calories  (via Obesity Panacea on PLoS Blogs)
    Swapping standing desks/stools for the usual classroom desk/chair combo correlated with increased standing, increased calorie burn, and positive effects on classroom behavior and performance.  Original journal article was published in the American Journal of Public Health here (login required).
  • Fact-checking of science news articles
    The debate we discussed here still goes on.

Written by sciencepolicyforall

October 12, 2011 at 10:24 pm

Posted in Linkposts

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