Science Policy For All

Because science policy affects everyone.

Science Policy Around the Web – October 17, 2014

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By: Thomas Calder, Ph.D.

“photo credit:CDC Global Health via photopin cc

Ebola Outbreak – Public Health

New Ebola Case Confirmed, U.S. Vows Vigilance

Amber Joy Vinson, the second nurse found to be infected with the Ebola virus, was discovered to have flown on a commercial plane the day before showing symptoms. Ms. Vinson had been caring for the Ebola victim Thomas Eric Duncan, and was therefore exposed to the virus. According to Dr. Tom Frieden, the director of the CDC, “Because at that point she was in a group of individuals known to have exposure to Ebola, she should not have traveled on a commercial airline.” Family members and flight crew are now being asked to stay home. Ms. Vinson, and the other infected nurse Nina Pham, may have been exposed to Ebola due to insufficient safety gear. To address this issue, the CDC announced changes to the required protected gear used by health workers when caring for Ebola patients in the U.S. The new stringent guidelines require hoods that cover the neck along and the addition of shoe and leg coverings. While there is concern among some of the general public about the government’s response to the Ebola crisis, President Obama provided this reassurance on Wednesday: “I want people to understand that the dangers of you contracting Ebola, the dangers of a serious outbreak, are extraordinarily low, but we are taking this very seriously at the highest level of government.” (Manny Fernandez and Jack Healy, The New York Times)

 

Science Publication and Communication

Copycat papers flag continuing headache in China

An article published in Science last year uncovered dozens of China paper-selling companies. These companies were exposed for fabricating data, adding authors to accepted manuscripts, and selling entire publications. Recently, a similar China-based company was discovered by two computational biologists: Guillaume Filion from the Centre for Genomic Regulation and Lucas Carey from Pompeu Fabra University. These researchers were originally mining Pubmed publication records from 2012-2014 to uncover new hot topics based on commonly used words. From their big data analysis approach, they found 32 papers that were meta-analysis or review articles with, as Filion describes, “disturbingly similar” wording. For example, one paper states, “Importantly, the inclusion criteria of cases and controls were not well defined in all included studies and thus might have influenced our results,” and another paper states, “Importantly, the inclusion criteria of cases and controls were not well defined in all included studies, which might also have influenced our results.” From their investigation, they found these papers originated from a website that sold papers with an impact factor of 2-3 for approximately $10,000. This big data analysis technique may be useful for uncovering other paper-selling companies in the future. (Mara Hvistendahl, ScienceInsider)

 

Science, Religion, and Education

Seminaries awarded $1.5 million to include science in coursework

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is striving to bridge the gap between religion and science by providing $1.5 million in grants to 10 U.S. seminaries with the goal of providing greater science education. According to Jennifer Wiseman, the director for AAAS Dialogue on Science, Ethics and Religion, “Many (religious leaders) don’t get a lot of science in their training and yet they become the authority figures that many people in society look up to for advice for all kinds of things, including issues related to science and technology.” The seminaries receiving these grants will engage in a pilot program to incorporate curriculum that includes science educational videos, events, guest speakers, and other science resources. Additionally, AAAS is coordinating with surrounding universities to provide science advisors. This pilot program hopes to educate seminarians and reduce any perceived hostility between scientists and the religious. (Sarah Pulliam Bailey, The Washington Post)

 

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

October 17, 2014 at 12:00 pm

Posted in Linkposts

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