Science Policy For All

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Science Policy Around the Web – February 20, 2015

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By: Nicholas Jury, Ph.D.

Photo credit: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout / Flickr

Academic Records – Privacy Regulation

Open records laws becoming vehicle for harassing academic researchers, report warns

In this digital age of communication where almost every public document is stored on a server, it is much easier for information to be disseminated to the public concerning academic research. However, a recent report entitled, “Freedom to Bully: How Laws Intended to Free Information are Used to Harass Researchers”, by the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) states that these same public records that are protected by open records laws to promote transparency are being used as a weapon by activists and lobbying firms to harass academic researchers with whom they disagree. The report specifically identifies discrepancies in how states may need to revise some of the laws that are used to promote transparency, while balancing the rights of privacy and academic freedom in responding to requests for information.

Journalists and activists have typically used these laws, most notably, the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), to request documents that could expose mismanagement and financial conflicts of interest. However, some groups have requested these documents in an effort to discredit the research often including water and air pollution, climate change, genetically modified organisms, and gun violence.

A few recent attempts include a request by former Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, a climate change denier, to obtain documents from the University of Virginia for research conducted by Michael Mann. However, Michael Halpern, a program manager with the USC says, “If lawmakers, universities, and researchers develop a shared understanding of what they should disclose and a system for proactively doing so, they can avoid costly and time-consuming lawsuits and other battles.   And that, in turn, will allow researchers to get back to what they are supposed to be doing: learning more about our world.”   Source: Puneet Kollipara (Science Insider)

 

Source: Val Altounian, Science

Source: Val Altounian, Science

Public Health – Ebola

Rapid test for Ebola now available

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), it has just approved a new rapid diagnostic test for the detection of the Ebola virus. The test is particularly useful in areas that are remote without electricity and far away from a well-equipped laboratory. Prior to this rapid test, the only available technology for detecting the virus was a PCR-based test that required a significant amount of blood from a needle draw. This was a slower way to test for the virus, as results could take more than a day. This new test only takes 15 minutes, and requires only a few drops of blood from a finger prick.

The new test is produced by Corgenix, a Colorado-based company that uses specific antibodies to identify specific Ebola virus protein. The total cost of each test will be roughly $15 says, Robert Garry, a disease expert at the University of Tulane in New Orleans. The WHO has determined that the kit has a success rate of 92% of identifying people that are infected with Ebola. This rapid test could assist health care workers and public health officials in determining new hotspots of Ebola outbreak.  Source: Gretchen Vogel (ScienceInsider)

Source:  Ashley Fisher / Flickr

Source: Ashley Fisher / Flickr

Federal Research Policy

A new shot at reducing research red tape

Running a research laboratory can be tough these days with very limited and highly competitive funding bids. On top of trying to maintain funding levels to keep a laboratory productive are the requirements of reporting progress to government entities. Scientists have long complained about how federal oversight can be a hindrance to their research. Perhaps it is time for some changes to make federal oversight of research better?

There is a new panel at the National Academies that is charged with determining exactly how the government is monitoring it’s nearly $40 billion per year investment. The panel considered a report that came out in 2005 that reports that some researchers spend up to 42% of their time working on reporting guidelines for federally funded research projects.

One concern is that the federal government doesn’t provide enough funding for universities to comply with new rules. Such new rules may cost universities about $4000 extra per student each year, said Arthur Bienenstock, physics professor and special assistant to the president of Stanford University. Larry Faulkner, president emeritus of the Univeristy of Texas at Austin spoke at the National Academies panel and said, “It would be a mistake to think that the only purpose of this study is to lighten the regulatory burden on universities. Regulation is required, it’s justified, and it’s needed. What we’re trying to do is guide both government and higher education to find more efficient ways to address those needs.”   Source: Jeffrey Mervis (ScienceInsider)

 

 

 

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

February 20, 2015 at 8:01 pm

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