Science Policy For All

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Science Policy Around the Web – June 30, 2015

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By: Eric Cheng, Ph.D.

Photo credit link: Affordable Care Act via photopin (license)

Health policy

Affordable Care Act survives Supreme Court challenge

On June 25, 2015, the Supreme Court upheld a key provision of the Affordable Care Act that allows the federal government to provide subsidies to people in all 50 states, and not just the 16 states that administer their own online insurance exchanges. This ruling means that people in states without their own exchanges can still get federal subsidies for the purchase of health insurance allowing an estimated 6.4 million people to keep their health care coverage, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. Without access to subsidies, millions of Americans would have been at risk of failing to meet the mandate that requires every American to buy health coverage. This ruling affirmed that the legislation that created the Affordable Care Act intended to improve the health care system and to provide support to all who needed help to buy health insurance.

Two of the court’s conservatives, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justice Anthony Kennedy, joined the court’s four liberal Justices in rejecting the lawsuit in a 6-3 vote to side with the Obama administration. “Congress passed the Affordable Care Act to improve health insurance markets, not to destroy them,” Roberts wrote for the majority. While Justice Antonin Scalia, who wrote in dissent, called the majority’s reasoning “quite absurd” and “interpretive jiggery-pokery.”

President Obama made a statement on the recent ruling, saying the Affordable Care Act “is here to stay.” (Robert Barnes, Washington Post)

Federal research funding

Senate panel approves $2 billion raise for NIH in 2016

A Senate appropriations subcommittee voted to approve $32 billion in funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for the 2016 fiscal year, representing an increase of $2 billion from 2015. This increase in funding could be the largest increase since 2003. Senator Roy Bunt (R-Mo.), chairman of the Senate Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee commented that “this year’s Labor-HHS appropriations bill prioritizes programs that will provide a significant benefit to all Americans and, most importantly, provides the National Institutes of Health with a $2 billion increase to make critical life-saving medical treatments and high-quality cures available to all Americans.”

The Senate panel approval will match the $200 million request by President Obama for the development of the Precision Medicine Initiative along with a $100 million increase for new funding to combat antibiotic resistance from the previous fiscal year. Other highlights include a $350 million increase for the National Institute on Aging, the lead Institute researching Alzheimer’s disease, and an additional $70 million for the BRAIN Initiative to map the human brain. These increases to every Institute and Center are intended help NIH to continue their development of new therapies, diagnostics, and preventative measures to enhance health, lengthen life, and reduce illness and disability. (Jocelyn Kaiser, ScienceInsider)

Environment and public health

House Advances Chemical Safety Reform Bill, Teeing Up Senate Vote

The U.S. House of Representatives passed legislation to overhaul the nearly 40 year old Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). This bipartisan bill aims to improve chemical safety. Some updates include the determination of risk by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) based on scientific evidence of its health impact instead of the cost of regulation. For new chemicals, the bill would shift the burden to industry to show that the substances they manufacture are not unreasonably risky. Other provisions in the bill would increase transparency by preventing industry efforts to keep safety data secret by declaring them confidential business information. This would allow EPA to more easily share chemical information with states, doctors, and first responders. These new reforms will help address an outdated law to protect human health and the environment from significant risks while also protecting commercial and competitive interests of the United States chemical industry and the national economy. (Kate Sheppard, Huffington Post; Puneet Kollipara, ScienceInsider)

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

June 30, 2015 at 9:00 am

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