Science Policy For All

Because science policy affects everyone.

Science Policy Around the Web – February 5, 2016

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By: Eric Cheng, Ph.D.

Photo source: pixabay.com

Environment, science and society

Congress approves bill to ban plastic microbeads in skin care products

Plastic microbeads used in a variety of personal-care products from soaps to face washes will be phased out starting in 2017. Microbeads are tiny plastic particles used as an abrasive in many beauty products such as facial scrubs, soaps, and toothpastes. These beads do not dissolve and can remain in the environment for decades.

The Microbead-Free Waters Act of 2015 was introduced by Congressmen Frank Pallone, Jr. (NJ-6), Ranking Member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, and Fred Upton (MI-6), Chairman of the Committee. It is believed that “these tiny plastic particles that are polluting our environment are found in products specifically designed to be washed down shower drains,” said Pallone. “And many people buying these products are unaware of their damaging effects on the environment.” This view is in alignment with research that shows how these beads slip through wastewater treatment systems and into waterways. Sherri A. Mason, an environmental chemist at the State University of New York in Fredonia, estimates that 11 billion microbeads are released into the nation’s waterways each day.

At the state level, states such as Illinois and California already have passed microbead bans while more than half of the states are considering them. However, the growing number of state and local laws with conflicting restrictions and timelines helped to motivate the sponsor of the bill in the Senate. The federal legislation will prohibit the manufacture of products containing plastic microbeads as of July 1, 2017, and phase out sales of the product over the next two years. The federal law will take precedence over state laws that are starting to phase out microbeads over similar concerns. (Congressional Research Service)

CRISPR technology

UK scientists gain license to edit genes in human embryos

A team of British scientists has received permission to edit genes in human embryos for scientific studies. Although there is currently a voluntary moratorium observed by scientists worldwide on DNA alterations that could be passed down to subsequent generations, the proposed studies would not contradict them because the altered embryos will not be implanted into a womb.

On February 1st, the British regulatory agency that oversees reproductive biology, the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority, approved an application by Kathy Niakan, of the Francis Crick Institute in London, to utilize a new genetic editing technique called Clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeats or CRISPR (or CRISPR/Cas9) to alter human embryos. This CRISPR system enables researchers to precisely remove specific DNA sequences.

In the United States, Congress has banned the government from supporting research where a human embryo is destroyed. This ban, however, does not apply to privately or state funded researchers. “This type of research should prove valuable for understanding the many complex issues around germline editing,” said George Daley, a stem-cell biologist at Boston Children’s Hospital in Massachusetts. “Even though this work isn’t explicitly aiming toward the clinic, it may teach us the potential risks of considering clinical application.” (Ewen Callaway, Nature)

Federal Research Funding

White House wants $1 billion for Vice President Biden’s cancer moonshot. Where will it come from?

In his next upcoming budget, President Barack Obama will ask Congress for $755 million for cancer research. This will bring the total price tag of Vice President Joe Biden’s cancer “moonshot” to $1 billion. However, it is still not known if Congress will agree to this new funding proposal for 2017. In addition, it is also not known how much existing money will be reshuffled at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in order to support this year’s moonshot plans.

Currently, the White House plans to immediately fund the Moonshot initiative with $195 million in “new cancer activities” at NIH for the 2016 fiscal year. Most of this spending is predicted to occur at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) which already received a $264 million boost in new money this year as part of the overall $2 billion NIH budget increase. Although researchers are “very excited and enthusiastic” about the initiative, they have questions about exactly where the money will come from, says Jon Retzlaff, managing director for science policy and government affairs for the American Association for Cancer Research in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Bolstering certain NCI programs partway into the fiscal year may force the institute to divert funds from other programs.

Currently, Biden plans to continue the moonshot’s financial momentum in the White House’s FY 2017 budget request to steer $75 million to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for moonshot activities, and $680 million for NIH. If this request will be approved by Congress is still up in the air, Retzlaff notes. This is because the budget request calls for using “mandatory funds” to pay for these increases. Mandatory funds are not directed through the regular annual appropriations process, but instead the money comes from dedicated sources approved by Congress. Using mandatory funds preempts congressional oversight which is generally not supported by lawmakers. If approved, this additional funding will represent an increase of about 15% over what the federal government is already spending on cancer research, the nation’s second leading cause of death. (Jocelyn Kaiser, Science magazine)

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

February 5, 2016 at 9:00 am

One Response

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  1. […] used in exfoliating skin care products contributed tens of millions of particles alone. The Microbead-Free Waters Act of 2015, which goes into effect in July 2017, will require companies to cease selling microbead products. […]


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