Science Policy For All

Because science policy affects everyone.

Science Policy Around the Web – February 23, 2016

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By: David Pagliaccio, Ph.D.

Kris Krüg via Photo Pin cc

Science in Schools

Climate confusion among U.S. teachers

Despite the vast agreement among scientists that global warming is occurring due to human activities, many difficulties persist in conveying this to middle and high school students. A new survey published in Science indicates that 74.3% of middle and high school science teachers discuss global warming but only at median rate of 1.5 class hours. Importantly, only 54% of teachers are clearly stating that fossil fuel use is a major cause of global warming rather than natural causes. The remainder presents a mixed message about the role that humanity plays in global warming vs. natural factors, denies humanity’s role, or does not present the causes of global warming. This may be due to several causes. Luckily, few teachers felt outside pressures from parents, school administrators, etc. to not teach about climate change. Instead, it appeared that a large percentage of teachers did not know the consensus among scientists and thus try to present a two-sided case about global warming. Further, less than half of teachers reported having formal training on climate change during their education though newer teachers were more likely to discuss the human causes of global warming. The authors also indicate a role for sociopolitical ideology where teachers with a more conservative view of the government’s role were less likely to emphasize teaching about the causes of climate change. The authors call for improved training, continuing education, and content materials, including updated textbooks, to aid in addressing this issue as well as trying to work to improve science literacy. (Eric Plutzer, Mark McCaffrey, A. Lee Hannah, Joshua Rosenau, Minda Berbeco, and Ann H. Reid, Science Education; USNews.com; NPR)

Science Funding

Budget 2017

President Obama has requested increased science funding in his fiscal year 2017 budget, yet people have concerns over the strategy for this and the likelihood of it passing Congress. Particularly, he requested an additional $825 million be allocated to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), but this money was set to come from mandatory funds. Further, $1 million of the NIH’s current budget was slated to be moved from regular appropriations processes to mandatory funds. There are concerns that Congress will not approve these mandatory funds, which require that a dedicated funding source be established. If approved, this new money would go to support new cancer initiatives, the Precision Medicine Initiative, and the BRAIN initiative with little going to the other NIH institutes. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) would also not get much of a general increase in funding but would get money specifically for its role in Precision Medicine Initiative and the new cancer programs – also from mandatory funding. The President has also called for a $500 million increase in funding for the National Science Foundation (NSF) coming from both discretionary and mandatory spending streams. Again, there is doubt that Republicans will approve of allocation through mandatory spending streams that will require selling federal assets, which would leave only a small increase in NSF funding through discretionary spending. While there are many increases in science funding budgeted for, many people are disappointed in the means of funding allocation and are less than optimistic for passing this proposed budget. (Science News Staff, Science Insider)

Federal Regulations

Could FDA E-Cigarette Regulations Help More People Quit Smoking?

While e-cigarettes are generally expected to be safer than traditional cigarettes due to the lack of tar from burning tobacco, research is limited and major health organizations currently do not recommend using e-cigarettes to help people quit smoking. Despite the large and expanding market for e-cigarettes, there are essentially no federal rules or regulations regarding anything about the e-cigarette industry, including sales and advertising. Several attempts have been made to regulate e-cigarettes with the FDA first trying to regulate e-cigarettes as a drug-device combination in 2009. This was overruled by the courts, which deemed e-cigarettes a tobacco product in the next year. Further, the President’s Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act allowed the FDA to regulate some tobacco products but did not specifically list e-cigarettes. In 2014, the FDA called for authority to specifically regulate e-cigarettes and is awaiting final approval. While no real federal regulations are in place, some states have enacted minimum purchasing age laws, tax e-cigarettes, or call for e-cigarettes to only be used in places where other tobacco products can be used. The science regarding the potential harms of e-cigarettes and any potential benefits to smoking cessation are lacking leading to much fractured debate over regulatory policy, which will continue as the FDA’s role continues to unfold. (Michael P. Eriksen, USNews.com)

Have an interesting science policy link?  Share it in the comments!

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

February 23, 2016 at 9:00 am

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