Science Policy For All

Because science policy affects everyone.

Science Policy Around the Web – May 10, 2016

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By: David Pagliaccio, Ph.D.

Source: Ashley Fisher / Flickr

Scientific Publishing

Who’s downloading pirated papers? Everyone

Sci-Hub is an online repository for millions of scientific and academic articles, which has sparked major controversy among the scientific and publishing communities. The site, launched in 2011 by Alexandra Elbakyan, a graduate student in Kazakhstan, provides free access to ‘pirated’ articles. These articles would otherwise only be accessible through personal or institution journal subscriptions or by purchasing individual articles, which often can cost ~$30 each. Recent analysis of Sci-Hub’s 28+ million download requests from September-February 2015 found that requests were coming from over 3 million different IP addresses (potentially many more individual users as those sharing university internet network will often share an IP address). These download requests came from all over the world and across all types of scientific fields. Download rates reached more than 200,000 per day. An opinion survey regarding Sci-Hub found that at least half of users download articles from Sci-Hub because they do not otherwise have access to the articles at all. Interestingly, many others use Sci-Hub purely out of convenience when they would still have access through their institution. Many respondents also use Sci-Hub in objection to the profits made by publishers off of academics and feel that efforts like Sci-Hub have the power to disrupt the status-quo of science publication. That said, Elsevier, of the largest publishers affected by Sci-Hub, launched a lawsuit against Elbakyan last year for infringing on their legal rights as copyright holders. Despite having their domain seized during the lawsuit, Sci-Hub is largely beyond the reach of the U.S. legal system by being based in Russia. This is an still evolving situation and debate, which may have large effects on the state of scientific publishing today particularly given the major support from much of scientific community. (John Bohannon, Science News)

Mental Health

New Study Shows Mental Health Diagnoses and Treatment Vary Significantly by Race and Ethnicity

The Department of Research and Evaluation at Kaiser Permanente published result of a large study in the journal Psychiatric Services regarding the diagnosis and treatment of mental health conditions. The study included data from electronic health records of 7.5 million adult patients. The patients were part of 11 private, not-for-profit health care systems participating in the Mental Health Research Network. The results indicated that 15.6% (1.17 million) of these patients received a mental health diagnosis in 2011. This varied by race and ethnicity from 7.5% among Asians to 20.6% among Native American/Alaskan Native patients. Most groups had generally lower diagnosis rates than non-Hispanic white patients. Importantly, regardless of race and ethnicity, all patients with a diagnosed mental health condition were much more likely to receive psychiatric mediations (73%) than they were to receive formal psychotherapy treatment (34%). While the study does not point to any specific causative factors, they do indicate a need for evaluation of the causes and effects of racial and ethnic differences in diagnosis and treatment of mental health conditions as well as those relating to the vast discrepancy in treatment by medication vs. therapy. (PR Newswire)

Child Development Policies

Bringing Brain Science to Early Childhood

Researchers at Harvard’s Center on the Developing Child are pushing better use of developmental psychology and neuroscience research in the creation and implementation of policy regarding early-childhood programs. Particularly, they critique incentives in the current policy system and call for research and development on the most effective early-childhood programs for stemming intergenerational poverty. Programs for child development should all be based on the rapidly evolving knowledge base in the scientific field and should be allowed to develop as we learn and understand more. Work in this area has shown lifelong consequences of early childhood stress as well as lifelong benefits of early positive parenting both on mental and physical health. The Center has already been to pilot programs in Washington state aimed at improving executive function and self-control among parents and children and hopefully to improve parental engagement. This work allows for testing and refining of new interventions based on data collected from the pilot testing. On the other hand, many interventions have previously been enacted at large-scale without adequate follow-up testing or methods for improvement based on outcomes. For example, they cite that the Head Start program, which aims to help young disadvantaged infants and children, has but has not utilized the infrastructure to evaluate the effectiveness of their various programs and to identify which programs benefit which types of individuals most. As research suggests, intervening early in development can be incredibly impactful, and thus we should be capitalizing on our scientific understanding to implement the most evidence-based programs and utilizing outcomes data to constantly improve our programs. (Emily Deruy, The Atlantic)

Have an interesting science policy link?  Share it in the comments!

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

May 10, 2016 at 9:00 am

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