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Science Policy Around the Web – December 20, 2016

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By: Liz Spehalski, PhD

Source: Flickr, under Creative Commons

In-Vitro Fertilization

UK Approves Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy Trials For Assisted Reproduction

The UK Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has given the green light to allow mitochondrial replacement therapy, a type of assisted reproduction that can help families to avoid passing on genetic diseases. The method is controversial because the embryos contain genetic material from three people: two eggs and one sperm. The decision has been widely anticipated and comes after years of debate and a change in the country’s laws in 2015.

Mitochondria are responsible for generating more than 90% of the energy required by the body to sustain life and support organ function. When mitochondria fail, cells generate less and less energy, resulting in cell injury and cell death. The parts of the body that require the most energy; the heart, brain, muscles, and lungs, are the most affected by mitochondrial disease. Mitochondrial disease is difficult to diagnose due to its wide range of symptoms, which can include seizures, strokes, developmental delays, blindness, and heart problems.

Mitochondrial replacement therapy involves exchanging damaged mitochondria for heathy ones by transferring only the nuclear DNA from one egg or fertilized embryo from the mother into a donor egg, whose mitochondrial DNA is intact but nuclear DNA is removed. The technique has already been performed in Mexico and the Ukraine, and John Zhang, a physician at New Hope Fertility Center in New York City, has said that a baby boy conceived by the technique in Mexico seems healthy to this point. Recent work with eggs from affected women, however, found that some of the defective mitochondria from the mother’s egg was transferred to the embryo along with the DNA, raising questions about the effectiveness of the treatment. Currently, congressional action has blocked the FDA from allowing mitochondrial replacement procedures to be attempted in the United States.

On December 15, the HFEA announced that it would allow clinics to apply for licenses to conduct limited trials of the technique, with the goal of preventing mothers from passing down mutations in mitochondria. “Today’s historic decision means that parents at very high risk of having a child with a life-threatening mitochondrial disease may soon have the chance of a healthy, genetically related child. This is life-changing for those families,” said HFEA chair Sally Cheshire. An HFEA spokesperson projected that the UK’s first child with three people’s DNA could be conceived as early as March 2017. (Ewen Callaway, Nature News)

Biotechnology

Commerce Secretary Announces New Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing Institute

Penny Pritzker, US Secretary of Commerce, announced on Friday a new institute to be added to the Manufacturing USA Institute; the National Institute for Innovation in Manufacturing Biopharmaceuticals (NIIMBL). The institute is the eleventh of Manufacturing USA Institute, the first funded by the Department of Commerce (DOC), and the first awarded under the Manufacturing USA “open topic” competition, in which industry was encouraged to propose institutes allocated to any manufacturing area that is not already being tackled.

While pharmaceutical manufacturing relies on chemistry, biopharmaceuticals are a drug product manufactured in or isolated from biological sources. They include vaccines, blood and blood components, stem cell and gene therapies, recombinant proteins, among other biologics. Many of these products are widely used for the treatment of an array of diseases such as cancer, autoimmune disorders and infectious diseases, generating billions of dollars worldwide.

The goals of this institute will be to keep biopharmaceutical manufacturing in the USA and to scale up the production of complex biological drugs. “In communities from coast to coast, the Manufacturing USA network is breaking down silos between the U.S. private sector and academia to take industry-relevant technologies from lab to market,” said Secretary Pritzker. “The institute announced today is a resource that will spread the risks and share the benefits across the biopharmaceutical industry of developing and gaining approval for innovative processes. The innovations created here will make it easier for industry to scale up production and provide the most ground-breaking new therapies to more patients sooner.”

NIIMBL received $70 million from the US Department of Commerce, and will be getting another $129 million from a public-private consortium of 150 companies, academic institutions, and nonprofits, as well as 25 states. The University of Delaware will be coordinating the institute’s partnership with the DOC. The hope is that NIIMBL will help to advance U.S. leadership in the biopharmaceutical industry, foster economic development, improve medical treatments, and ensure a qualified workforce by collaborating with educational institutions to develop new training programs matched to specific biopharma skill needs. (Press Release, Department of Commerce)

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

December 20, 2016 at 9:07 am

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