Science Policy For All

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Science Policy Around the Web – December 23, 2016

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By: Joel Adu-Brimpong, BS

Source: Flickr, by Ben Gordon, under Creative Commons

Public Health

Looking Beyond Flint

All eyes turned to the city of Flint, Michigan as it burst onto the national scene after reports revealed that children were being exposed to dangerously high levels of lead in their drinking waters. Although shocking, a recent study shows that the Flint narrative is no abnormality. “In fact, it doesn’t even rank among the most dangerous lead hotspots in America,” states Reuters, an international news agency and investigative body that conducted the study.

In this Reuters report, it was discovered that almost 3000 areas in the country had at least twice the lead poisoning rates of the infamous Michigan city, with much less press coverage. In some areas, such as Baltimore, Cleveland and Philadelphia, areas with multigenerational lead poisoning, about 40 to 50 percent of children had elevated levels of lead. Nationwide estimates by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) purport that approximately 2.5 percent of small children, children between ages one and five, present highest levels.

For this study, Reuters obtained lead poisoning data from state health departments and the CDC. But rather than peruse and detail state or county-level data, Reuters pursued more granular results; testing for lead poisoning at the neighborhood-level. Altogether, Reuters observed 2,606 census tracts, or small county subdivisions, and 278 zip codes across the country with at least twice the prevalence rate of lead poisoning as Flint. It was noted that while poverty remains an integral predictor of lead poisoning, victims span the American tapestry of rich and poor, urban and rural and black and white.

Federal aid to assist states in lead poisoning management is quite limited. After the Flint debacle, Congress delivered $170 million in aid to Flint. However, the budget allocated to the CDC to assist states in lead poisoning control is only a fraction of the Flint package. With the 21st Century Cures Act set to withdraw approximately 3.5 billion from the Prevention and Public Health Fund, a fund established under Obamacare, and a pervasive political rhetoric regarding the repeal of Obamacare, lead poisoning may return to its obscure position in the public sphere. (M.B. Pell and Joshua Schneyer, Reuters)

Drug Policy

When Drug Prices Rise, Americans Turn Outward?

A recent study revealed that 70 percent of Americans take at least one prescription drug a day. And if you are among this group, or care for someone on medication, you are most likely aware that drug prices have been rising. In fact, a 2015 poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) found that roughly 80 percent of Americans deemed costs of prescription drugs ‘unreasonable.’ A report by the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics earlier this year indicated that, after accounting for estimated reimbursements, net medication spending for the 2015 year was roughly $310 billion. So what happens when drug prices exceed affordability in the U.S.?

A poll by KFF last month found eight percent of survey respondents, or roughly 19 million adults in the U.S., had or knew someone in their household who had imported a drug at some point. Drug prices when obtained outside the country (i.e., Canada, Mexico, etc.) may be half the sticker price in the U.S., or even cheaper. This finding comes on the heels of recent spikes in prescription drug prices such as that of Daraprim, a life-saving drug often prescribed for AIDS patients, Cycloserine, a drug used to treat tuberculosis, Epipen, an injection device for patients with severe allergies, and others which have caused national outrage.

Although illegal for Americans, in most instances, to import drugs into the U.S. for personal use due to safety and effectiveness concerns, experts contend that eight percent is a conservative number. Some respondents may be reluctant to report violations of the law or are uncomfortable with talking about daily struggles with drug affordability. Demographics of individuals who imported prescription drugs ranged from young adults in college to elderly retirees, with prescription drugs imported spanning treatments for chronic and acute conditions.

Earlier this week, Senate Democrats sent a letter to Donald Trump urging the President-elect to effect bipartisan support to curb rising drug prices. But with no assurances in sight to curtail the epidemic of rising drug costs, will even more Americans turn outward in order to meet their prescription needs? If so, how might this affect the quality of circulating drugs and medication adherence practices? (Rachel Bluth, Kaiser Health News)

Have an interesting science policy link?  Share it in the comments!

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

December 23, 2016 at 9:00 am

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