Science Policy For All

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Science Policy Around the Web – April 29, 2017

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By: Saurav Seshadri, PhD

digital forensics 5” by jon crel is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Forsensic Science

Now Who Will Push Ahead on Validating Forensic Science Disciplines?

The realities of forensic science remain far removed from the white-coated wizardry depicted on shows like CSI. Although forensic results often heavily influence criminal trials, there is a substantial gap between the perceived and true reliability of commonly used methods such as fingerprint and bitemark identification. The National Commission on Forensic Science (NCFS) was established in 2013 to help close this gap, by promoting rigorous, independent evaluation of forensic techniques, as well as communication between law enforcement agencies and academic scientists. The NCFS was supported jointly by the Department of Justice (DOJ) and National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST), and has published over forty documents reflecting the consensus of scientists, lawyers, law enforcement officers, and other stakeholders.

Recently confirmed Attorney General Jeff Sessions has decided not to renew the NCFS’ charter, which expired on April 23, 2017. Its work will ostensibly be taken over by a new entity, which will be developed by a DOJ Subcommittee on Forensics and spearheaded by an as-yet-unnamed, DOJ-appointed Senior Forensic Advisor. The DOJ is currently seeking input on how best to organize this initiative, but its actions already suggest an unwillingness to follow expert guidance, such as the original recommendations from the National Academy of Sciences that led to the creation of the NCFS. The recommendations include ‘[t]his new entity must be an independent federal agency…[i]t must not be part of a law enforcement agency’ and ‘…no existing or new division or unit within DOJ would be an appropriate location for a new entity governing the forensic science community’.

Despite this setback, some of the NCFS’ contributions, such as promoting acceptance of the need for licensing and accreditation, may have a lasting influence on the field. In the NCFS’ absence, NIST is expected to play a central role in coordinating the forensic science community. Support for these efforts will be critical to improving standards in forensic practice, and ultimately, to providing justice to the American public. (Suzanne Bell, The Conversation)

Infectious Disease

Ghana, Kenya and Malawi to Take Part in WHO Malaria Vaccine Pilot Program

While interventions such as insecticide-treated mosquito nets have dramatically reduced malaria-related deaths, almost half a million people still die annually from the disease, predominantly children in sub-Saharan Africa. Continuing the fight against malaria, the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa (WHO/AFRO) has announced that a pilot program to test the world’s first malaria vaccine will begin in 2018. The vaccine (RTS,S or MosquirixTM) is the result of over $500 million in investment from GlaxoSmithKline and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. It has shown promising results in Phase 3 trials, reducing rates of malaria by almost half in children treated at 5-17 months old. Following guidance from two independent advisory groups, the WHO will implement the vaccine in three countries that have high malarial burdens despite ongoing, large-scale anti-malaria efforts. The first stage of the program, which is being funded by several international health organizations in addition to WHO and GSK, will span 2018-2020, with final results expected in 2022.

RTS,S has followed an unconventional route to its current stage of development. It was approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) under Article 58, a mechanism that allows the EMA’s Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) to collaborate with the WHO and international regulatory agencies to evaluate drugs intended for use in developing countries. However, in the first ten years after its inception in 2004, just seven drugs received positive opinions from CHMP through Article 58, and among these, the EMA has reported limited commercial success. This track record, combined with the emergence of more attractive incentive programs to develop drugs for tropical diseases (including a priority review voucher system launched by the FDA in 2007), has raised questions about Article 58’s effectiveness. A positive outcome for RTS,S could revitalize the program and lead to more innovative treatments for vulnerable populations worldwide. (WHO/AFRO press release)

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

April 29, 2017 at 8:56 pm

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