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Science Policy Around the Web – July 21, 2017

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By: Rachel F Smallwood, PhD

Source: pixabay

Cancer

Engineered Cell Therapy for Cancer Gets Thumbs Up from FDA Advisers

A panel of advisers has recommended that the FDA approve chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapy for treatment of acute B-cell lymphoblastomic leukemia. The committee unanimously agreed that the risk to benefit ratio was favorable enough to proceed with approval of the drug (tisagenlecleucel), manufactured by Novartis. CAR-T therapy utilizes a patient’s own immune cells to find and attack cancer cells. In a recent trial in humans, 82.5% of patients went into remission following treatment with the drug; there have also been promising results from its use in glioblastoma treatment. The treatment would specifically be for pediatric and young adult patients who did not respond well to initial treatments or who relapsed from being in remission.

Despite have strong positive effects, there are potential risks posed by CAR-T therapy. In the study mentioned above, almost half of the patients experienced an inflammatory reaction called cytokine release syndrome. Although all of those cases were treatable, the condition can be life-threatening. Novartis also reported neurological problems. Other CAR-T trials have had several deaths due to brain swelling, but those were in adult populations and were some differences in the therapies.

The FDA often does take the recommendations of its advisers, but there is much to consider in this decision. It would essentially be approving a living drug that is individualized to each patient; the patients’ own blood cells are sent to a manufacturing center, where they are genetically engineered to target leukemia cells. The cell population is then allowed to proliferate, and the entire process takes around twenty-two days. This process presents a quality assurance and control problem to the FDA. However, the target population typically has a poor prognosis and very few options, so the panel considers the potential for increased survival and quality of life to be worth the risks. (Heidi Ledford, Nature News)

Stem-Cell Therapy

Unapproved Stem-Cell Treatments Touted on Federal Database Clinicaltrials.Gov

ClinicalTrials.gov is an online database, curated by the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, that logs clinical studies occurring around the country and allows them to be searched by patients, family members, healthcare providers, and researchers. The information on the site is provided by the researchers or sponsors of the individual studies themselves. It allows patients and healthy people to become aware of opportunities to participate in medical research. These studies involve a wide range of treatments, including drugs, devices, behavioral therapies, and procedures.

A recent study found that the database is being abused by clinics advertising for stem cell trials. These trials target individuals looking for treatment for a variety of conditions, and all of them charge for participation. There are very few FDA-approved stem cell therapies, and most clinics that utilize stem cell therapies assert that they do not need FDA approval since they are practicing medicine and do not substantially alter the stem cells (although that is disputed).  Since the researchers themselves indicate in the database whether they need FDA approval, there is little oversight to ensure these studies are correctly representing the risks and benefits of their treatment.

Although a disclaimer was added this spring that informs visitors that the presence of a trial in the database does not indicate government endorsement of it, many people do not realize that they could potentially be participating in a for-profit procedure that does not have the proper oversight to ensure patient safety. In one such case, three women were blinded who paid to receive stem cell therapy for macular degeneration. Most legitimate research studies will not require payment for participation, although travel and lodging costs associated with participation may be incurred.

While many patients may receive treatment at one of these clinics without an adverse event or even with a positive result, critics of these types of clinics are calling for regulation of entries into the ClinicalTrials.gov system. They assert that a federal resource for medical research should not be used to advertise for for-profit clinics that are utilizing therapies that have not been studied or reviewed for safety and efficacy. (Laurie McGinley, Washington Post)

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

July 21, 2017 at 10:08 am

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