Science Policy For All

Because science policy affects everyone.

Science Policy Around the Web – February 6, 2018

leave a comment »

By: Liuya Tang, PhD

Linkpost_20180206

source: pixabay

Cancer treatment

Breast cancer treatments can raise risk of heart disease, American Heart Association warns

Common cancer treatments include surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy are always applied before or after surgical removal of a tumor, or applied to cancer patients when surgery cannot be performed. Not only will they attack tumor cells, chemotherapy or radiation therapy will also damage normal cells at the same time, which increases risks for other diseases. A recent report in the journal Circulation said that breast cancer treatments can raise risk of heart disease. It has been noticed that “breast cancer survivors who are 65 and older and were treated for their cancer are more likely to die of cardiovascular problems than breast cancer.” The possible cardiovascular consequences of breast cancer treatments may not be new to oncologists, but new cancer treatments have complex side effects which may not fully understood as they work differently from conventional cancer treatments. For example, the newly-developed cancer treatment, immunotherapy, stimulates the patient’s immune system to attack tumors, but sometimes the surging immune response can overshoot its target and attack healthy tissues and organs.

It is not a good idea to stop cancer treatment due to side effects, as saving ones life from a dangerous cancer is critical. But for this double-edged sword, how to make one edge blunt while keeping the other edge sharp? This requires surgeons and oncologists to work together to make a personalized treatment plan. As suggested by Dr. Deanna Attai, a breast surgeon at the University of California at Los Angeles, the patients with less-aggressive tumor may skip chemotherapy based on the test results on the cancer’s risk of recurrence. In addition, adopting different ways to deliver chemo drugs and developing more-targeted radiation can reduce the risks of cardiac damage for breast cancer patients.

It is not solely a doctor’s responsibility to monitor the side effects of cancer treatments, patients also need to be aware of what types of treatments and what the possible side effects are. Wrong treatments of side effects can aggravate symptoms, which may lead to severe problems. The new emerging immunotherapy presents a big challenge to the health care system as the side effects are not thoroughly understood. Doctors’ organizations and nonprofit groups are joining information campaigns to narrow the knowledge gap on immunotherapy, which will help patients better understand procedures of cancer treatment and manage any side effect if it occurs.

(Laurie McGinley, The Washington Post)

 

Drug development

Racing to replace opioids, biopharma is betting on pain drugs with a checkered past

The opioid epidemic has become a significant problem in the US, as 116 people died every day from opioid-related drug overdoses in 2016. To resolve this issue, biopharma continues to develop pain drugs. The class of drugs are called NGF inhibitors, which were halted by FDA in 2010 due to their severe side effects. NGF is short for nerve growth factor, which is a neuropeptide. When an injury occurs, the production of NGF is increased, which helps the brain perceive the pain. Theoretically antibodies that specifically bind NGF before it reaches cell receptors could be a good choice to inhibit NGF function, therefore treating people with chronic pain. But it was found that NGF antibodies are not suitable for a subset of patients with osteoarthritis, for whom treatment lead to dramatic joint deterioration. To obtain FDA’s approval of entering further clinical trials, drug companies showed that NGF drugs will probably be safe for patients not at risk of joint deterioration and shouldn’t be taken with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as Advil. So the clinical study was resumed in 2015. Will it become a replacement drug of opioids? Will the benefits outweigh its risks? The results will be put on table this year after drug companies finish their Phase 3 studies.

 

The severity of the opioid epidemic and the high need of non-addictive painkillers have kept drug companies optimistic about developing NGF drugs despite the side effects. However, there are opposite voices. The watchdog group Public Citizen criticized that the side effects are obvious and “further pursuit of testing in humans was an unreasonable course of action”. Criticisms also come from the business side. Leerink analyst Geoffrey Porges has warned Regeneron’s NGF drug would carry “all of the liabilities” of the past and scolded their continuing to pour money into the project. The failure has already been seen in the development of fulranumab, which is one type of NGF antibody. Even if NGF antibodies were approved by FDA, doctors would have concerns for prescribing a medication with potentially dangerous outcomes for patients with certain conditions.

(Damian Garde, STAT News)

 

 

Have an interesting science policy link?  Share it in the comments!

Advertisements

Written by sciencepolicyforall

February 6, 2018 at 10:53 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: