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Science Policy Around the Web – May 1, 2018

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By: Liu-Ya Tang, PhD

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source: pixabay

Artificial Intelligence

With €1.5 billion for artificial intelligence research, Europe pins hopes on ethics

While artificial intelligence (AI) brings convenience to modern life, it may cause some ethical issues. For example, AI systems are generated through machine learning. Systems usually have a training phase in which scientists “feed” them existing data and they “learn” to draw conclusions from that input. If the training dataset is biased, the AI system would produce a biased result. To put ethical guidelines on AI development and catch up with the United States and China in AI research, the European Commission announced on April 25 that it would spend €1.5 billion to AI research and innovation until 2020.

Although the United States and China have made great advances in the field, the ethical issues stemming from AI may have been neglected as both practice “permissionless innovation”, said Eleonore Pauwels, a Belgian ethics researcher at the United Nations University in New York City. She spoke highly of Europe’s plan, which is expected to enhance fairness, transparency, privacy and trust. But the outcome is still unknown. As said by Bernhard Schölkopf, a machine learning researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Tübingen, Germany, “We do not yet understand well how to make [AI] systems robust, or how to predict the effect of interventions”. He also mentioned that only focusing on potential ethical problems would impede the AI research in Europe.

What are the reasons why the AI research lags behind the United States and China? First of all, Europe has strong AI research, but a weak AI industry. Startup companies with innovative technologies, which are oftentimes risky, cannot receive enough funds as the old industrial policies favor big, risk-averse firms. So the commission’s announcement underscores the importance of public-private partnerships to support new technology development. The second reason is that salaries are not high enough to keep AI researchers in academia as compared to the salaries in the private sector. To solve this problem, a group of nine prominent AI researchers asked governments to set up an intergovernmental European Lab for Learning and Intelligent Systems (ELLIS), which would be a “top employer in machine intelligence research” and offer attractive salaries as well as “outstanding academic freedom and visibility”.

(Tania Rabesandratana, Science)

Public health

Bill Gates calls on U.S. to lead fight against a pandemic that could kill 33 million

Pandemic diseases, mainly caused by cholera, bubonic plague, smallpox, and influenza, can be devastating to world populations. Several outbreaks of viral diseases have been reported in scattered areas around the world, including  the 2014 Ebola epidemic, leading to growing concerns about the next wave of a pandemic. During an interview conducted last week, Bill Gates discussed the issue of pandemic preparedness with a reporter from The Washington Post. Later, he gave a speech on the challenges associated with modern epidemics before the Massachusetts Medical Society.

The risk of a pandemic is high, as the world is highly connected and new pathogens are constantly emerging as consequences of naturally occurring mutations. Modern technology has brought on the possibility of bioterrorism attacks. In less than 36 hours, infectious disease and pathogens can travel from a remote village to major cities on any continent to become a global crisis. During his speech, Gates cited a simulation done by the Institute for Disease Modeling, which estimates that nearly 33 million people worldwide could be killed by a highly contagious and lethal airborne pathogen like the 1918 influenza. He said “there is a reasonable probability the world will experience such an outbreak in the next 10-15 years.” The risk becomes higher when local government funding for global health security is not adequate. The U.S. Centers for Disease and Prevention is planning to dramatically downsize its epidemic prevention activities in 39 out of 49 countries, which would make these developing countries even more vulnerable to the outbreaks of infectious diseases.

Gates expressed this urgency to President Trump and senior administration officials at several meetings, and he also announced a $12 million Grand Challenge in partnership with the family of Google Inc. co-founder Larry Page to accelerate the development of a universal flu vaccine. He highlighted scientific and technical advances in the development of better vaccines, antiviral drugs and diagnostics, which could provide better preparation for, prevention of and treatment of infectious disease. Beyond this he emphasized that the United States needs to establish a strategy to utilize and coordinate domestic resources and take a global leadership role in the fight against a pandemic.

(Lena H. Sun, The Washington Post)

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

May 1, 2018 at 5:53 pm

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