Science Policy For All

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Science Policy Around the Web – July 3, 2018

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By: Jennifer Patterson- West, PhD

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source: wikimedia commons

Women’s Health

Pregnant Women: Avoid Soft Cheeses, But Do Get These Shots

During pregnancy, expecting mothers are advised to avoid a slew of activities, foods and medications to protect their unborn child including alcohol, unpasteurized cheese, lunch meat, ibuprofen and even hot baths.  What may come as a surprise is that the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologist (ACOG) recently released an immunization guide that advise expecting mothers on which vaccine to receive during pregnancy and which to avoid.  It also highlights vaccines that should only be given to high risk patients or immediately following birth.

The influenza vaccine is given to protect the mother who is more likely to get seriously sick if she contracts the flu. The Tdap vaccine is recommend at 27-36 weeks of gestation during each pregnancy to boost the maternal immune system in order to protect the newborn.  In addition to this recommendation, the CDC also recommends anyone who plans to come in contact with the baby receive the Tdap vaccine at least 2 weeks prior if they are not up-to-date with their vaccines.

In 2015, 20,762 cases of pertussis, the infectious agent responsible for whooping cough, were reported to the CDC by the State Health Department. Although this is a 37% decrease compared to 2014, these numbers can be further improved by improved coverage of those in contact with unvaccinated infants.

The goal of these guidelines is to further reduce the number of cases of whooping cough in babies younger then 3 months old, a time when the disease is most fatal.  For babies that contract whooping cough, half of them will end up in the hospital and some will die. Although these recommendations are not new, many expecting parents may be unaware of what vaccinations should be received during pregnancy. The CDC estimates that only half of pregnant women in the United States receive the Tdap vaccine.

(Selena Simmons-Duffin, NPR)

Drug Approvals

FDA approves Country’s first medicine made from marijuana

On June 25, the FDA announced the approval of the first drug with an active ingredient derived from marijuana.  Epidiolex is an oral solution approved for the treatment of seizures associated with  Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome.

Both are rare and severe forms of epilepsy.  Lennox-Gastaut syndrome typically presents between the ages of 3 and 5 as frequent seizures. The majority of children with the syndrome exhibit learning and intellectual disabilities and delayed motor skills.

Dravet syndrome is a rare genetic disorder that presents as frequent fever-related seizures during the first year of life.  Children with this disorder commonly have underdeveloped language and motor skills. With age, other seizure types and symptoms typically arise that are potentially life-threatening. No drug had previously been approved specifically for the treatment of Dravet syndrome, which is why FDA granted Priority Review to the application and orphan drug designation.

The approval of Epidiolex has the potential to increase the quality of life for many patients with these rare syndromes The active ingredient derived from marijuana is cannabidiol (CBD), which was shown to be effective at reducing the frequency of seizures compared to a placebo in clinical trials.  Epidiolex does not contain THC, the psychoactive component of marijuana, that causes a euphoric high.

CBD is currently classified as a Schedule I substance in accordance with the Controlled Substance Act (CSA).  Schedule I substances include drugs or chemicals with no accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.  Although more than thirty states have passed legislation that permits the use of medical marijuana or CBD, cannabis is still categorized as a Schedule I substance under the CSA.

The approval of Epidiolex provides a path forward for the approval of other marijuana-derived medications, or treatment of additional indications, that do not conflict with federal law.  The FDA Commissioner, Dr. Scott Gottlieb, stated that “We’ll continue to support rigorous scientific research on the potential medical uses of marijuana-derived products and work with product developers who are interested in bringing patients safe and effective, high quality products.”

(Andrew Joseph, STAT News)

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

July 3, 2018 at 2:19 pm

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