Science Policy For All

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Science Policy Around the Web – April 12, 2019

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By: Saurav Seshadri, PhD

Photo by Elijah Hiett on Unsplash

With Vertex, NHS back at the pricing table, CF advocates ratchet up the pressure

petition demanding coverage of the cystic fibrosis (CF) drug Orkambi in the UK has now garnered over 100,000 signatures, and must therefore be considered by Parliament for debate.  The milestone is the latest development in the struggle between Orkambi maker Vertex Pharmaceuticals and the British government, which began soon after Orkambi was approved in 2015.  The main point of contention is the price of the drug.  The UK’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has refused to recommend Orkambi at Vertex’s asking price of £104,000 ($136,000) per patient per year, but Vertex has rejected the UK’s offer of £500 million for 5 years’ access, leaving both parties at an impasse.

The UK is not the first country to clash with Vertex over pricing. Several health agencies have refused to pay for Orkambi on the grounds that it is only marginally effective; some now face lawsuits, as programs like Medicaid are required to provide available drugs for qualifying patients.  While Orkambi is not as effective as Vertex’s first drug Kalydeco, it can be prescribed to more patients (up to 50% of those with CF).  Life expectancy for patients with CF is less than 40 years, and many patients are children, so even small improvements can be life-changing.  However, as with the multiple sclerosis drug Ocrevus, NICE seems unlikely to relent; on the contrary, UK Health Minister Matt Hancock recently accused Vertex of ‘hold[ing] the NHS to ransom’ and ‘profiteering’.  

For its part, Vertex is unlikely to compromise on the price of its best-selling drug, which brought in $1.26 billion in 2018.  CEO Jeffrey Leiden insists that this revenue is critical to the company’s continued investment in CF research.  Ironically, this stance may be pushing the UK closer to a measure that would jeopardize all future medical R&D efforts: invoking ‘Crown’ use, which allows the government to sell a patent without the consent of its owner. While the idea has gained support among some British lawmakers, and has been used in the past (to make Pfizer-owned antibiotic tetracycline available in the 1960s), it would face legal challenges that could render it ineffective.  But with public pressure mounting, especially after Vertex recently admitted to destroying almost 8,000 packs of Orkambi amid the standoff, inaction may not be an option for much longer.

(Eric Sagonowsky, FiercePharma)


Why some low-income neighborhoods are better than others

A recent study, published in PNAS, builds upon a body of evidence that while race can influence upward mobility (with white children having a 4-fold higher chance of moving from the lowest to highest income brackets than their black peers), environmental factors also play a major role.  Previous work demonstrated that the neighborhood in which a child grows up has a large effect on their future success, with better outcomes for children raised in low-poverty neighborhoods, regardless of race.  However, black children are significantly less likely to live in such neighborhoods.  To combat racial inequality, it is critical to understand which aspects of poverty impact long-term socioeconomic progress. 

The new study is based on the Opportunity Atlas, and pulls together data from tax returns, Census surveys, police reports, prison admission records, and blood tests conducted by the health department. The data tracks a cohort of children born in 1978-1983 (age 31-37 in 2014), living in 754 Census tracts in Chicago.  The authors report that even after controlling for other variables, a large proportion of the racial disparity observed in adults can be explained by three factors: violence, incarceration, and lead exposure during adolescence.  Since these factors were highly correlated with each other, the authors combined them into a single ‘neighborhood harshness/toxicity’ factor; this variable proved to be a much stronger predictor of income, incarceration, and teen pregnancy than more traditional factors, such as poverty or college education rates.   

That these elements impair social mobility is perhaps not surprising, as exposure to both violence in the community and high levels of lead have both been linked to cognitive impairment. But the magnitude of the effect is striking: for example, according to their model, toxicity exposure could account for 60% of the difference in incarceration rates between black and white men in their sample, and a 10% increase in teen births among black women.  While the authors acknowledge they cannot establish causality, they conclude that ‘Chicago’s residential segregation is disproportionately exposing its black children to neighborhoods that are hazardous to their development’.  Recently elected mayor Lori Lightfoot ran on a platform that includes stopping violence, expanding affordable housing, and ‘investing in our neighborhoods’.  Insight into the mechanisms that perpetuate inequality can only enhance these policies’ power to improve the trajectories of vulnerable kids.      

(Sujata Gupta, Science News


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Written by sciencepolicyforall

April 12, 2019 at 5:21 pm

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