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Science Policy Around the Web – November 10, 2017

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By: Vanessa L.Z. Gordon-Dseagu, PhD

20171110_Linkpost

Source: Pexels

Healthcare

House Passes CHIP Funding, Sends Bill to Uncertain Future in Senate

The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) aims to extend healthcare coverage for children living in low-income households. Funded jointly by the federal government and states, the program currently covers around 8.9 million children and 370,000 pregnant women. Initially started in the 1990s, the program has helped to reduce the number of uninsured children from 13.9% in 1997 to 5.3%% at the start of 2017:. Previous funding for CHIP stopped on Oct 1, 2017, although the majority of states have enough money to pay for the program until 2018.

On Friday November 3rd, the House passed (by 242-174 votes) the Healthy Kids Act to extend funding for CHIP for the next five years. Although passed, the act is not without contention. The majority of Democrats voted against the bill due to concerns over how the program would be funded. The current act aims to fund CHIP via increased premiums for older, wealthier individuals on Medicare, narrowing the period for those under Affordable Care Act (ACA) to pay their premiums and taking money from the ACA’s Prevention and Public Health Fund -the fund is the first of its kind mandated to focus upon prevention and improvements in public health.

As reported in a number of sources, the issue of funding is likely to delay the bill once it reaches the Senate, with both Democrats and Republicans accusing each other of delay tactics. Rep Frank Pallone (D-N.J.) stated that the bill “will go to the Senate, and it will sit there”, while Greg Walden (R-Ore.) accused the Democrats of “Delay, delay, delay.” A number of commentators suggest that funding for CHIP will be rolled in to an end-of-year budget seeking to prevent a government shut-down.

(Laura Joszt, The American Journal of Managed Care)

Healthcare

Maine Voters Approve Medicaid Expansion, a Rebuke of Gov. LePage

The ballot question was a relatively simple one:

“Do you want Maine to expand Medicaid to provide healthcare coverage for qualified adults under age 65 with incomes at or below 138% of the federal poverty level, which in 2017 means $16,643 for a single person and $22,412 for a family of two?”

And on the 7th of November, in the first successful vote of its kind, residents of Maine demonstrated overwhelming support (59% voted yes) for the policy. Seeking to expand Medicaid, under the umbrella of the Affordable Care Act, an estimated 70,000 individuals living in the region would receive coverage – the program is specifically for those who are currently uninsured and earning ≤138% of the federal poverty line – 31 states already have similar programs in place.

A key stumbling block to implementation of the program comes from strong opposition from Maine’s Governor Paul LePage. The governor, who had on five occasions previously vetoed health insurance expansion bills proposed by the state legislature, responded to the vote in a statement on the 8th of November calling it “fiscally irresponsible” and “ruinous to Maine’s budget.” In defense of the expansion, Anne Woloson of Maine Equal Justice Partners commented that, with 90% of funding coming from central government, “This will improve the Maine economy. It’s going to create good-paying jobs.”

LePage also stated that his administration was not prepared to expand Medicaid unless the state found a way to pay for it at the levels calculated by the Department of Health and Human Services, but the ability of the governor to veto the implementation of such legislation is limited and it is likely to become law in 2018.

Following the ballot’s success, and with increasing support for Medicaid expansion nationally, advocates in Utah and Idaho are planning similar votes in their own states.

(Abby Goodnough, The New York Times)

 

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

November 10, 2017 at 6:55 pm

Healthcare Policy – What’s in Store for Our Future Healthcare Needs?

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By: Emily Petrus, PhD

       There’s no question that the US spends too much on healthcare – in 2015 it cost 18% of its GDP, equivalent to $3.2 trillion dollars. In fact, we spend more on healthcare to cover just 34% of our population via Medicare and Medicaid than other countries who cover their entire population with universal healthcare. Most people assume that this higher spending equals better health, but unfortunately this isn’t the case.

According to a 2015 Commonwealth Fund survey, the US has the highest infant mortality and obesity rates and the lowest life expectancy of the top 13 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. In addition, we have the highest rates of prescription drug use, amputation due to diabetes mismanagement, and the second highest death rate from ischemic heart disease. Our relatively small percentage (14.1%) of people over age 65 also have the highest rate of at least two chronic illnesses per person. These numbers are estimated to increase as baby boomers age, so the outlook isn’t good when considering how many elderly people we can expect to suffer from chronic health issues.

However, it’s not all doom and gloom – we are in the top 3rd for surviving cancer, boast the lowest smoking rates, and have the highest access to diagnostic imaging services (such as MRI and CT scans). In this light, it makes sense that we spend more, have better access to expensive technology, and use more expensive prescription drugs. Another way to slice the data paints a different picture. The sickest 5% of the population accounts for 50% of medical spending, and accounts for 60% of spending on prescription drugs. Together these data indicate that the US could be in better shape if we had a healthier population.

How could we make the population healthier? Let’s consider that the determinants for health are 30% genetics, 70% behavior, environment and social factors, only 10% is mediated by healthcare. Other OECD countries spend significantly more on social services such as supportive housing, employment programs, retirement and disability programs. Social services are especially beneficial for people in lower income brackets, who incidentally have the poorest health in the US. The life expectancy for the poorest Americans is about 13 years less than the wealthiest. Racial disparities also contribute to gaps in healthcare outcomes for Black, Hispanic, Asian and American Indians/Alaskan Native Americans, all of whom experience worse medical care. The parameters measured included access to care, effective communication with medical staff, and a specific source of ongoing medical care, such as a primary care physician. It is estimated that these disparities amount to billions of dollars in economic loss – $35 billion in excess health care expenditures – for example, a trip to the emergency room for something that could be treated by better access to a primary care physician. Expanding Medicaid would increase medical access to poor and disadvantaged minority groups, for example, Blacks in the south. However, many states thatch have high at-risk populations decided not to expand Medicaid. Spending more on social services aimed at improving people’s health seems to be working in other OECD countries, and the National Academy of Medicine recommends the US increase spending in these areas.

Social services are unlikely to gain support from conservatives, so spending in this area is unlikely to be supported by the current administration. However, there are other areas in healthcare that can gain bipartisan support. 30% of medical expenses are considered wasteful – meaning they are for unnecessary services, fraud, and sky high pharmaceutical or administrative costs. Medicare has already saved billions of dollars by reducing overpayments to private insurers and tying medical provider payments to quality of care. Overall a goal of those involved in healthcare reform should seek to follow this example of prioritizing value over volume of care, which will translate to better outcomes at lower costs for patients and taxpayers.

So what did the Affordable Care Act (ACA, also known as Obamacare) achieve since it was passed in 2010? In the time leading up to the ACA, 82% of the American public wanted healthcare reform. Private insurance premiums were rising 10% per year, and insurance didn’t have to cover expensive benefits, so many plans came without services like mental health or maternity care. Maternity care is not just a women’s issue, healthier pregnancies result in healthier babies who become part of our population. Before the ACA, 50 million (17%) of the population was uninsured; by 2016 20 million people had gained health insurance, leaving only 10% of our population uninsured. Women and people with pre-existing conditions can’t be denied coverage or charged more by insurance companies. Lifetime spending caps were removed, meaning if you were a sick baby in the ICU you can’t be denied coverage for the remainder of your life. The most popular part of the bill allows young adults to stay on their parents’ insurance until age 26, which reduced the uninsured rate for young adults by 47%. Finally, tax credits made health insurance through exchanges more affordable for those at or below 400% of the federal poverty line.

Those are the good parts about the ACA – here’s the bad news.  High deductible plans have increased from 10% of plans offered in 2010 to 51% of plans in 2016, meaning people buying insurance can expect to pay at least the first $1,000 per year out of pocket. If it seems that premiums are jumping, they are: they rose 20% from 2011 to 2016. It’s easy to blame the ACA for rising premiums, but if we consider that premiums rose 10% per year before the ACA, 20% in 5 years doesn’t sound so bad. Some specific states are expecting huge increases, for example Oklahoma will see a 42% increase in 2016. Part of the reason premiums are rising is because healthcare gets more expensive each year – it outpaces inflation and wages. Insurance companies are also losing money because they have enrolled more sick, expensive people than they expected to when they set prices. The ACA attempted to mediate the sticker shock for insurance companies by setting up “risk corridors” to help shoulder the burden, but that part of the bill was scuttled for political reasons, and now insurance companies are passing the buck to consumers. Regarding taxes, under the ACA, those without insurance will face a penalty fee double that of the 2015 amounts.

A central campaign promise of Trump and Republicans was to repeal the ACA and provide better and more affordable coverage for all.  The American Health Care Act (AHCA) proposed several weeks ago by Republicans was a repeal and replace bill which was unpopular from the start. The AHCA was unpopular with conservatives for not going far enough to repeal the ACA, while moderates worried about the 20 million people, including their constituents, being denied or outpriced from insurance due to some elements of the bill. The AHCA removed the mandates requiring insurance companies to provide essential health benefits. This could lower premiums but insurers could also reduce services, leading to “junk plans”. Additionally, tax credits for people buying insurance would be significantly lower than current levels, making insurance too expensive for many middle-income people. Medicaid coverage was also proposed to shrink, resulting in less coverage for poor Americans. Finally, eliminating the community rating of the ACA would enable insurance companies to charge older and sicker people higher premiums, essentially pricing those who need insurance the most out of the market. The AHCA proposed to ameliorate this problem by providing larger tax credits to older individuals and setting up pools of high risk people subsidized by the government.

It is safe to assume that the Republican controlled House, Senate and the White House will try again to present bills that modify the ACA. However, it remains to be seen if they will try a bipartisan effort to fix certain parts of the bill that are flawed, or repeal and replace the ACA with something completely new.

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

April 14, 2017 at 9:22 am

Science Policy Around the Web – March 14, 2017

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By: Liz Spehalski, PhD

Affordable Care Act

ACA Replacement Bill Released by House

Last Monday, House Republicans released their plan to repeal and replace former President Obama’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), also known as Obamacare. The American Health Care Act (AHCA), a more conservative vision for the nation’s health care system, was created as a collaboration between the White House and the Senate Republicans. The Republican Party has been critical of the ACA because of the large role that it created for the federal government in health care, such as the need for the IRS to verify eligible people for financial help and federally mandating the public to have health insurance.

The AHCA will maintain some of the popular features of the ACA, such as allowing young adults to stay on their parent’s health care plans until the age of 26, banning lifetime coverage caps, and maintaining the ban on discrimination against people with pre-existing conditions. It also temporarily maintains the expansion of Medicaid to cover millions of low income Americans through January 1, 2020.

Instead of the individual mandate, a fine penalizing Americans for failing to have health insurance, the new bill would try to encourage people to sustain coverage by allowing insurers to impose a 30 % fine to those who have a gap between plans. The AHCA also changes the structure of tax credits given to those who want to buy insurance. Under the ACA, people who earn less than 200 percent of the poverty line get the highest subsidies. The Republican plan would instead give tax credits based mostly on age. The AHCA will also cut off federal funds to Planned Parenthood through Medicaid and other government programs for one year.

While Republicans did not offer any estimate of how much their plan would cost, or how many people would gain or lose insurance coverage, the Congressional Budget Office released its estimate yesterday, raising concerns. Two key House committees swiftly approved the bill, but uncertainty surrounds how this bill will fare in Congress, as some conservatives are concerned that it does not go far enough to remove government from health care, while others are concerned about their constituents losing coverage due to the loss of Medicaid expansion. No Democrats are expected to support the bill. (

Obesity

Fewer Overweight Americans Trying to Lose Weight

A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association this week found that the percentage of Americans trying to lose weight is declining. In 1990, when researchers asked overweight Americans if they were trying to lose weight, 56% responded yes, while that number decreased to 49% in 2014. Researchers analyzed US government health surveys from 1988 through 2014 which involved in-person physical exams and health- related questions including whether the participants had tried to lose weight within the last year. The study included over 27,000 adults ages 20-59, and weight status was determined using body mass index (BMI).

The explanation behind this trend seems to be the shift in public perception over dieting and overweight people. “Socially accepted normal body weight is shifting toward heavier weight. As more people around us are getting heavier, we simply believe we are fine, and no need to do anything with it,” said lead author Dr. Jian Zhang, a public health researcher at Georgia Southern University. The authors of the study also discuss other possible reasons for this data, such as primary care physicians not discussing weight issues with their patients.

Though the decline of 7% may seem low, this number could represent up to seven million Americans, as more than two thirds of adults are considered to be overweight or obese, according to recent NIH statistics. Scientists say this is concerning because obesity increases the risk of a host of diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, liver disease, osteoarthritis, and stroke. However, “There’s a possible good news story in this,” says Janet Tomiyama, a psychologist at UCLA who studies eating behavior and weight stigma. “We’re not going to shame people into health,” Tomiyama says, “a lot of research shows that having a healthy body image is what leads to better health outcomes. Maybe people are taking the focus off the number on the scale, and going more towards focusing on their health.” The CDC’s current  obesity prevention efforts focus on policy and environmental strategies that target the affordability of healthy eating and active living, noting that fad diets can be unhealthy and tend to fail over the long term. (Allison Aubrey, NPR)

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Written by sciencepolicyforall

March 14, 2017 at 10:00 am