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Posts Tagged ‘vaccine

Science Policy Around the Web – April 29, 2017

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By: Saurav Seshadri, PhD

digital forensics 5” by jon crel is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Forsensic Science

Now Who Will Push Ahead on Validating Forensic Science Disciplines?

The realities of forensic science remain far removed from the white-coated wizardry depicted on shows like CSI. Although forensic results often heavily influence criminal trials, there is a substantial gap between the perceived and true reliability of commonly used methods such as fingerprint and bitemark identification. The National Commission on Forensic Science (NCFS) was established in 2013 to help close this gap, by promoting rigorous, independent evaluation of forensic techniques, as well as communication between law enforcement agencies and academic scientists. The NCFS was supported jointly by the Department of Justice (DOJ) and National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST), and has published over forty documents reflecting the consensus of scientists, lawyers, law enforcement officers, and other stakeholders.

Recently confirmed Attorney General Jeff Sessions has decided not to renew the NCFS’ charter, which expired on April 23, 2017. Its work will ostensibly be taken over by a new entity, which will be developed by a DOJ Subcommittee on Forensics and spearheaded by an as-yet-unnamed, DOJ-appointed Senior Forensic Advisor. The DOJ is currently seeking input on how best to organize this initiative, but its actions already suggest an unwillingness to follow expert guidance, such as the original recommendations from the National Academy of Sciences that led to the creation of the NCFS. The recommendations include ‘[t]his new entity must be an independent federal agency…[i]t must not be part of a law enforcement agency’ and ‘…no existing or new division or unit within DOJ would be an appropriate location for a new entity governing the forensic science community’.

Despite this setback, some of the NCFS’ contributions, such as promoting acceptance of the need for licensing and accreditation, may have a lasting influence on the field. In the NCFS’ absence, NIST is expected to play a central role in coordinating the forensic science community. Support for these efforts will be critical to improving standards in forensic practice, and ultimately, to providing justice to the American public. (Suzanne Bell, The Conversation)

Infectious Disease

Ghana, Kenya and Malawi to Take Part in WHO Malaria Vaccine Pilot Program

While interventions such as insecticide-treated mosquito nets have dramatically reduced malaria-related deaths, almost half a million people still die annually from the disease, predominantly children in sub-Saharan Africa. Continuing the fight against malaria, the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa (WHO/AFRO) has announced that a pilot program to test the world’s first malaria vaccine will begin in 2018. The vaccine (RTS,S or MosquirixTM) is the result of over $500 million in investment from GlaxoSmithKline and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. It has shown promising results in Phase 3 trials, reducing rates of malaria by almost half in children treated at 5-17 months old. Following guidance from two independent advisory groups, the WHO will implement the vaccine in three countries that have high malarial burdens despite ongoing, large-scale anti-malaria efforts. The first stage of the program, which is being funded by several international health organizations in addition to WHO and GSK, will span 2018-2020, with final results expected in 2022.

RTS,S has followed an unconventional route to its current stage of development. It was approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) under Article 58, a mechanism that allows the EMA’s Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) to collaborate with the WHO and international regulatory agencies to evaluate drugs intended for use in developing countries. However, in the first ten years after its inception in 2004, just seven drugs received positive opinions from CHMP through Article 58, and among these, the EMA has reported limited commercial success. This track record, combined with the emergence of more attractive incentive programs to develop drugs for tropical diseases (including a priority review voucher system launched by the FDA in 2007), has raised questions about Article 58’s effectiveness. A positive outcome for RTS,S could revitalize the program and lead to more innovative treatments for vulnerable populations worldwide. (WHO/AFRO press release)

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April 29, 2017 at 8:56 pm

Science Policy Around the Web – January 24, 2017

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By: Leopold Kong, PhD

Landfill by Dhscommtech at GFDL, via Wikimedia Commons

Environment

New Discovery Could Lead to a Safer Solution to Plastic Pollution

Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is a commonly used resin of the polyester family used in the fibers for clothing and liquid containers. In 2015 alone, 56 million tons of PET was produced. Although recyclable, with 1.5 billion pounds recovered annually in the United States, PET is not biodegradable and is a major presence in landfills. Screening 250 samples of contaminated soil, waste water and sludge from a bottle recycling factory for microorganisms that can grow on PET, a team of Japanese scientists has discovered a bacterium, Idoenella sakaiensis, that can break down this tough plastic. Recently spotlighted as a major breakthrough of 2016 by the American Chemical Society, research on the bacterium continues as scientists seek to unlock the mechanism behind the biodegradation pathway that was previously thought to be impossible. Professor Kenji Miyamoto, one of the study authors, said, “This is the first PET-degrading bacterium found [with potential] to develop a new and nature-friendly system”. (Research Highlights, Keio University).

Biomedical Research

Trump Asks NIH Director Francis Collins to Stay On

Last Thursday, on the eve of the inauguration, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced that Dr. Francis Collins has been asked to continue his role as NIH director by the Trump administration for an unspecified time. This eleventh hour development came as Collins received back the letter of resignation he had sent late last year, something all presidential appointees do. If asked to stay on through this presidential term, Collins, part of Obama’s science ‘dream team’, would be the first NIH director since the 1970s to be chosen by two presidents.

Ezekiel Emanuel, a bioethicist at the University of Pennsylvania said, “In general, I think more than eight years has not been a good idea. There’s a cycle, and eight years is hard to have new ideas and new energy.”  Nonetheless, Collins, a National Academy of Sciences member who led the human genome project and a highly vocal Christian apologist, would serve as an effective bridge between the research community and the new Republican administration to secure much needed funding for basic research. Tony Mazzashi, senior director for policy and research at the Association schools and Programs of Public Health in Washington DC said, “ I think everyone in the research community will be thrilled.” (Jocelyn Kaiser, Science)

Public Health

Novavax Starts New Clinical Trial in Bid to Prove Failed RSV Vaccine

Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is a significant public health burden, infecting almost all children by age 2, with 5 to 20 out of 1,000 requiring hospitalization and with a mortality rate of 8 to 34 out of 10,000. Unfortunately, the development of an effective vaccine has been challenging. In the late 1960s, an RSV vaccine for infants devastatingly failed clinical trials with 80% of children receiving the shot being hospitalized. Recent advances in immunology and the RSV vaccine target has led to a new generation of potentially safer and more effective vaccine candidates from industry giants Novavax, GlaxoSmithKline, Global Vaccines, AstraZeneca and MedImmune. Also being explored is vaccination of expectant mothers to protect infants.

However, the field took a hit last year when Novavax’s candidate vaccine failed its phase 3 clinical trials, resulting in a 30% layoff of its workforce. Nonetheless, last Thursday, the company announced that it has started a new phase 2 trial on older adults in the southern hemisphere.  “We expect the results from this trial to inform the next steps in our older adults program and would ensure we maintain our leadership position in this very attractive market opportunity,” said Stanley Erck, president and CEO of Novavax. (Tina Reed, Washington Business Journal)

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January 24, 2017 at 10:04 am

Science Policy Around the Web – April 12, 2016

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By: Amy Kullas, Ph.D.

A representation of the surface of the Zika virus is shown. A team led by Purdue University researchers is the first to determine the structure of the Zika virus, which reveals insights critical to the development of effective antiviral treatments and vaccines. (Purdue University image/courtesy of Kuhn and Rossmann research groups)

Funding the ongoing Zika pandemic

Shifting funds for Zika is a good start, but more money is still needed

Last week, the White House made the decision to redirect $589 million in unspent federal funds, previously allocated for an Ebola response, to cover costs associated with fighting and researching Zika. The White House is still advocating for additional funding for both the ongoing Zika pandemic and to replenish the money that was moved away from Ebola. Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), informed ScienceInsider that ~$50 million of the reallocated funds will go to NIAID to fund Zika research. None of the redirected funds will come out of the money that NIAID had previously received for research on Ebola, as the vast majority of those funds have already been spent. Further, Fauci warns “That’s not enough to last me very long. We can start the work, but we can’t finish what we need to do.”

Dr. Anne Schuchat, principal deputy director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed in a press conference on April 12, “Everything we know about this virus seems to be scarier than we initially thought.”

In February, the Obama administration had requested almost $2 billion to help thwart the Zika virus and its transmission. Unfortunately, the Republican-controlled Congress failed to act on this emergency funding request. White house officials are nevertheless still trying to persuade Congress to pass the emergency Zika funding. Fauci bleakly predicts, “If we don’t get all of the Zika money, that is when things start getting hurt,” alluding to the possibility of having to further shift critical NIAID funds away from ongoing malaria, influenza, and tuberculosis research. (Puneet Kollipara, ScienceInsider)

Mental Health

Solutions to mental health impairments require global collaboration

Globally, almost 1/3 of people will suffer from a mood, anxiety, or substance-use issue during their lifetime. In fact, these disorders are one of the leading causes of disability. The resources to assist people facing these problems are not only inadequate in the United States, but around the world as well. There are some countries in Africa, where people are extremely underserved leaving them particularly vulnerable because these countries have the fewest resources for mental-health care as they only one psychiatrist for the entire country. In fact, there are only 9 mental health providers per 100,000 people worldwide.

Importantly, support for mental health does not lack political backing. Both the World Health Organization and the World Bank will coorperate to broaden global efforts in mental health. This past September, mental health was included in the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. Since 2011, new investments (estimated at ~$80 million US) have been made by the three largest funders of mental-health research in low- and middle-income countries: the US National Institute of Mental Health, Grand Challenges Canada, and the UK Department for International Development. Recently, research has focused on efficacy, effectiveness and implementation in the low- and middle-income countries. These local research teams often work or consult with colleagues in rich countries. Researchers, clinicians, and caregivers must unite to all work together because “when it comes to mental health, all countries are developing.” (Pamela Y. Collins & Shekhar Saxena, Nature Comment)

Vaccine shortage and Global Health

Dangerous shortage of yellow fever vaccine

Four. There are only four facilities worldwide that produce yellow fever vaccines: the Pasteur Institute, two government facilities in Russia and Brazil, and a French vaccine company Sanofi Pasteur. Unfortunately, their combined efforts have been failing the world’s demands and the ongoing outbreak in Angola only further emphasizes the escalating shortage. Jack Woodall, formerly of the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization, warns “another major outbreak…could be impossible to control.” He admits that this potential is something that he’s deeply concerned about.

Yellow fever is an acute viral hemorrhagic disease transmitted by infected mosquitoes. The ‘yellow’ in the name refers to the jaundice that affects some patients. Without treatment, up to half of severely affected people will die. Annually, there are an estimated 60,000-80,000 deaths attributed to yellow fever globally. There is no specific treatment for yellow fever, leaving vaccination the most important preventative measure.

When a yellow fever outbreak occurs in an urban setting, like the one in Angola, it is often relentless as the mosquitoes can easily transmit the virus person to person. William Perea, of the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) Control of Epidemic Diseases department, stated that Angola has confirmed 490 cases and almost 200 deaths, the actual numbers could be 10 fold higher. Since February, a large vaccine initiative has been underway, reaching 6 million of Luanda’s estimated 7.5 million residents. Currently, yellow fever has stretched into 6 of the 18 provinces in the country. The global emergency yellow fever vaccine stockpile has been left empty, unlikely to be replenished anytime soon. (Kai Kupferschmidt, ScienceInsider)

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April 12, 2016 at 12:00 pm

Science Policy Around the Web – March 22, 2016

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By: Emily Petrus, Ph.D.

Forensic science

Forensics gone wrong: When DNA snares the innocent

The 2015 TV series “Making a Murderer” has shed light on a disturbing issue in criminal justice – the dubious results of forensic scientists and the tests used to convict suspects. Though sensational, this is not a new problem in the field of forensic science. In 2012, a forensic scientist in Boston was arrested for tampering with evidence and recording positive tests for substances (such as drugs or blood) to ensure convictions. Other examples of forensic mismanagement include the Amanda Knox trial in which evidence was mishandled from the crime scene to the lab to the courtroom. Although Knox is likely innocent, the Italian justice system used poorly executed forensic “evidence” to keep her in jail for four years.

DNA evidence is now considered the gold standard in the courtroom, but before sequencing strategies were available, scientists often relied on microscopic characteristics of hair to make positive identifications. Just last month Santae Tribble, who served 28 years in jail for a murder he did not commit, was awarded $13.2 million. He was convicted using the presence of hair which was just like his, with a one in 10 million chance it could belong to somebody else. Now with DNA analysis it was discovered that the stocking used to cover the murderer’s face contained hair from 3 other individuals and one dog – but not Tribble.

What does this mean for Policy? Although advances in forensics enables our justice system to link suspects to crimes not previously possible, there must be more oversight into how the experiments are performed. We need more controls, blind experiments, and supervisor oversight in crime labs. Additionally, new technology must be rigorously tested to ensure that detections and genetic analyses are accurate. For example, currently 13 different positions on genes (loci) are used to detect if there is a genetic match, but the FBI will soon require analysis of 20 loci. This increases the sensitivity of genetic tests, and presumably the quality of evidence at trials. (Douglas Starr, Science News)

Infectious Diseases

Dengue Fever Vaccine is Effective – What About Zika?

Global warming has many reasons to keep us up at night, including rising sea levels, mass extinctions and reduction in resources, but perhaps the most immediately terrifying result is the increased prevalence of diseases spread by our least favorite organism, the mosquito. With the advent of summer we can expect more people to suffer from mosquito borne pathogens such as Zika virus, Malaria or Dengue fever. Viruses transmitted by mosquitos or between humans are nothing new, but global warming has expanded the territory in which these mosquitos can be found. This increased threat to the United States population has made production of vaccines an urgent priority for American scientists.

New hope is on the horizon, as scientists have successfully demonstrated that a new vaccine for Dengue fever is 100% effective. This brings optimism for quickly producing vaccines for Zika virus and other viral vectors, as successful technology for the Dengue fever vaccine can be translated to other diseases. Scientists are characteristically hesitant to make conclusions regarding a timeline for Zika vaccines, with some predicting years before one which is safe and effective. However, with the summer Olympics in Brazil just a few months away, now is the time for major funding and initiatives to produce a Zika vaccine for Brazilians and those traveling to the games. (http://www.RT.com)

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March 22, 2016 at 9:00 am

Science Policy Around the Web – February 16, 2016

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By: Julia Shaw, Ph.D.

Photo Credit: Kara Wall

The Environment

NYC waters are teeming with plastic particles, study finds

A recent study, conducted by the environmental group NY/NJ Baykeeper, has concluded that the waters around New York City are a “soup of plastic.” Inspired by a similar study of the Great Lakes, NY/NY Baykeeper collected water samples from the East River, the Hudson River in New York Harbor area, and the Passaic River and Raritan Bay in New Jersey and analyzed them for their plastic content. This study found an average of 256,322 plastic particles per square kilometer, with approximately 165 million plastic bits floating in the Harbor area. Plastic microbeads used in exfoliating skin care products contributed tens of millions of particles alone. The Microbead-Free Waters Act of 2015, which goes into effect in July 2017, will require companies to cease selling microbead products. Carcinogenic chemicals can also adhere to plastic particles, and be ingested by fish and shellfish mistaking the particles for food. As a result, city and state officials are advising women who are or may become pregnant and children to avoid eating seafood caught in the waters around New York City. A spokeswoman for the mayor said reducing plastics and other waste is a priority for the administration, which is working to put in place a ban on plastic-foam food containers as well as engaging in a public awareness campaign encouraging the use of reusable bags, mugs, and bottles in place of disposables. (Karen Matthews, Phys.org)

Global Health

Zika Virus Test is ‘Weeks, Not Years’ Away, WHO Says

Though first discovered almost 70 years ago in Uganda in 1947, the Zika virus has not been well-studied. However, the latest outbreak of Zika in Latin America is about to change that. On February 1st the World Health Organization (WHO) declared Zika virus a global public heath emergency. Zika virus is related to other mosquito-vectored viruses including those that cause dengue, yellow fever, and West Nile, but no test specific for Zika is commercially available. However, ten companies have developed assays to either directly detect viral particles in the blood or to detect specific antibodies raised against the virus. According to the W.H.O. assistant director general for health systems and innovation, Dr. Marie-Paule Kieny, these assays bode well for the first commercial tests being available in a matter of weeks following independent validation and regulatory approval. Symptoms of infection include fever, rash, joint pain, and red eyes, yet the most startling consequences are an apparent link to the neurological disorders microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome in babies born to women exposed to the virus while pregnant. The government of El Salvador has advised women to delay any pregnancies until 2018, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the WHO are recommending pregnant women avoid travel to areas where the virus is actively circulating. Because the virus also appears capable of sexual transmission, the WHO further advises couples living in endemic areas to use condoms. Two early vaccine candidates, one from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and another from an Indian pharmaceutical company, Bharat Biotech, are being developed, yet Dr. Kieny cautions that “vaccines are still at least 18 months away from large-scale trials.” (Sewell Chan with contributions from Donald G. McNeil Jr., The New York Times)

Biomedical Ethics

Karolinska Institute vice-chancellor resigns in wake of Macchiarini scandal

Anders Hamsten, vice-chancellor of Stockholm’s Karolinska Institute (KI) has stepped down amidst ongoing controversy surrounding the work of surgeon Paolo Macchiarinini, a visiting professor at KI from 2010 through October 2015. A recent documentary that aired on Swedish public television re-ignited interest in the case, which involved the implantation of artificial trachea into eight patients, six of whom have since died. While originally hailed as a great success for regenerative medicine, questions have been raised concerning the accuracy of Macchiarini’s published papers describing the effectiveness of the technique. Hamsten led an investigation into Macchiarini’s work last year following the submission of whistleblower reports detailing suspected research misconduct by the surgeon, however, Hamsten cleared Macchiarini of all charges. In November, KI awarded Macchiarini a new 1-year contract. In a recent article published in the Swedish newspaper Dagens Nyheter, Hamsen reversed his opinion stating, “[I]t seems very likely that my decision in this case was wrong. I realize it will be difficult for me to continue working as Vice Chancellor of Sweden’s most successful university with credibility and effectiveness.” The Macchiarini misconduct case is set to be reopened and responsibility for the inquiry transferred to the Central Ethical Review Board of Sweden. (Gretchen Vogel, ScienceInsider)

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February 16, 2016 at 9:00 am

Science Policy Around the Web – July 31, 2015

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By: Kaitlyn Morabito, Ph.D.

GMOs

US House moves to block labeling of GM foods

The debate about genetically modified organisms (GMOs) labeling has made it to the federal level. On July 23rd, the US House of Representatives approved H.R. 1599, the Safe and Affordable Food Labeling Act. This bill prevents states and localities from being able to require the labeling of GMOs on food products and sets up a voluntary US Department of Agriculture (USDA) program for foods to be certified as non-GMO. Additionally, it expands the ability of the FDA to regulate and prevent the sale of food based on safety data or a lack of safety data. States such as Vermont, Connecticut, and Maine already have laws related to the labeling of GMO foods. If this bill becomes law, the laws in these states will be negated. Proponents of this bill, including the food industry, Republicans and some Democrats, argue that the scientific community has reached the consensus that GMOs are not harmful and that this bill makes a uniform national policy on the labeling of food. Opponents of the bill, argue that consumers have a right to know what is in their food. The fate of this bill in the Senate and White House approval is unknown. (Puneet Kollipara, Science Insider)

2016 Budget

Budget showdown leave US science agencies in limbo

With the fiscal year nearing a close, it is once again time for the annual panic over whether Congress will pass a 2016 budget or if the government will shutdown. Congress will be back in session beginning in early September and will have 3 weeks to hammer out a budget deal for 2016 before the 2016 fiscal year officially begins on October 1st. Experts do not expect a 2016 budget to pass by this deadline, but do anticipate that a temporary deal will prevent a government shutdown. During these negotiations, the budgets of the US science agencies hang in the balance. The Senate and House of Representatives have both passed 2016 budgets, but these bills need to be reconciled between the two chambers and approved by the White House.   While funding for the government’s largest science agency, National Institutes of Health (NIH), is expected to rise by about $1 billion with either budget, other science agencies may not fair as well. The largest discrepancies in funding are among the agencies that fund climate change research and the social sciences including NASA, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Science Foundation (NSF). The Republican-controlled House Budget included many stipulations on how these agencies can use their funds. A final budget may not be passed until months into the 2016 fiscal year. (Chris Cesare, Nature News)

Vaccines and Global Health

First malaria vaccine takes a key step forward

The first efficacious malaria vaccine (RTS,S) has health organizations and the manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), puzzled about how best to use it, if at all. An ideal vaccine would achieve 95% efficacy, but this malaria vaccine only showed 30% efficacy in a phase III clinical trial in young children in sub-Saharan Africa. Although experts only expected 50% efficacy at the start of that trial, the vaccine only protected 39% of toddlers and 27% of infants against malaria. Although a huge achievement, the market for RTS,S is not clear and there are many other aspects that need to be considered including “cost-effectiveness, feasibility and the public-health value of the vaccine compared with other interventions” such a mosquito control. Use of vaccines and other interventions are often based on recommendations from organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and European Medicines Agency (EMA). So far, the EMA has released a “positive scientific opinion” of the vaccine in Africa for children between 6 weeks and 17 months old based on the fact that vaccine does more good than harm. The WHO has yet to release a recommendation, but is expected to do so by the end of the year. Recommendations from these health organizations do effect funding for vaccinations, but does not directly determine their use, which is decided by the countries themselves. (Leslie Roberts, Science Insider)

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July 31, 2015 at 9:00 am

Science Policy Around the Web – October 28, 2014

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By: Lani S. Chun

photo credit: BWJones via photopin cc

Ebola Outbreak – Public Health

WHO convenes meeting to discuss the development and implementation of Ebola vaccine

Much attention has been given to the isolated incidents of travelers inadvertently bringing Ebola outside of West Africa, feeding fears that Ebola may become a global epidemic. However, it is important to note that there have only been 10 deaths and 27 cases confirmed outside of the three hardest hit countries—Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia—where almost 5,000 ebola deaths out of over 10,000 cases have been confirmed. This highlights the need to concentrate on the plight of the citizens and healthcare workers who are living and working in West Africa, where limited healthcare resources, long-standing cultural traditions, and distrust in the government are prolonging and exacerbating the ebola outbreak. On the 23rd of October, the WHO convened a meeting to discuss the development and implementation of ebola vaccines as the best option to curb current and future ebola outbreaks. Among the 90+ participants were representatives of governments, charities, banks, pharmaceutical companies, and academic scientists. As a result, production of potential vaccines is scheduled ramp up in 2015. In addition, clinical trials and approvals of said vaccines will be fast-tracked with the prioritization put on vaccination of healthcare workers. (Chris Johnston, The Guardian; Patterson Clark, Washington Post; CDC; WHO)

 

Nobel Prize in Chemistry

2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry co-awardee, Eric Betzig, makes additional contributions to the field of microscopy

The Nobel Prizes serve as symbols of global participation in the advancement of culture, human welfare, and scientific achievement and are widely considered crowning achievements for awardees, but Eric Betzig isn’t just accomplished; he’s prolific. On October 8, 2014, Eric Betzig shared the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his contribution to the development of single-molecule microscopy, which he was the first to utilize in 2006. Sixteen days after the Nobel Prize announcement, his group published a paper in Science, describing another ground-breaking method called lattice light-sheet microscopy. Lattice light-sheet microscopy overcomes the low spatio-temporal resolution of current technologies, allowing in vivo, 3D visualization of highly dynamic processes with minimal photobleaching and background fluorescence. This method provides a more nuanced and detailed mechanism for visualizing cellular processes and is an essential advancement of fluorescence imaging technology. (Rachel Feltman, Washington Post; Nobelprize.org; Chen et al., Science)

 

Federal Science Policy

USA share of internationally funded nuclear fusion research in jeopardy due to Congressional concerns over budget

In 2007, the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) Agreement was signed and ratified by six countries (China, India, Japan, South Korea, Russia, and USA) and the European Union. With the ratification of the agreement, the countries set out to collaboratively build and test a magnetic confinement system, called a tokamak, that could serve as a proof-of-concept for nuclear fusion as a source of energy. Although the tokamak will not be used to produce electricity, the goal of the 30-year project is to demonstrate that energy output from nuclear fusion can be ten times greater than energy input. Construction of the largest tokamak to date began in 2013 with scheduled completion of the machine in 2019. The USA agreed to build 9% of the tokamak regardless of the price tag. However, mismanagement, ballooning expenditures, and moving deadlines have caused some members of Congress to question the cost-benefit potential of US participation in such a high-cost, long-term project with relatively uncertain outcomes. Some Senate members have moved to end US funding for the project by next year. With upcoming elections in multiple states and low approval ratings, it is to be seen what direction Congress will go with respect to ITER. (Adrian Cho, Science; ITER.org)

 

 

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October 28, 2014 at 5:49 pm